Configuring SMTP Namespace Sharing between two Exchange Forests – Part 1

In this series of the Post I will be going through every aspect that is required to achieve a single SMTP Namespace shared between two or more domains. I will be considering that both domains have their Email Infrastructure based on Exchange Server 2007. This Path will allow us to cover complex topics in detail so that no body misses out.

I will start off by presenting the scenario on which this post will unfold.

There is a company A which has its Email Infrastructure based on Exchange Server 2007 and its domain name is DOMAINA .LOCAL. Company A uses DOMAINA.COM as its Email Alias.

There is another company B which also has its Email Infrastructre based on Exchange Server 2007 and its domain nane is DOMAINB.LOCAL. Company B uses DOMAINB.COM as its Email Alias.

There is a Merger situation between company A and company B and the Management decides to unify the employees of both the companies under a single Email Domain. Though it has also been decided that there will be no change in their existing Active Directory Domain Infrastructure. The new Email Alias has been finalised to be DOMAINC.COM. This Email Alias will be shared between users of Company A as well as Company B.

Having explained the scenario, its time to list the steps that will be carried out to achieve the same. Each of these steps will be further explained in detail in the posts that follow.

  1. Configuring Network Connectivity between the Organizations
  2. Configuring DNS Registrations for Shared Namespace
  3. Configuring Name Resolution on Internal DNS
  4. Configuring Accepted Domains on the Hub Servers
  5. Creating Connectors on the Hub Servers
  6. Resolving Routing Loops
  7. Creating Email Address Policy for Shared Namespace
  8. Procuring & Installing Unified Communications Certificate
  9. Configuring new Exchange URLs in both Domains
  10. Handling Cross-Forest Autodiscover Queries
  11. Publishing the new Exchange URLs on ISA\TMG
  12. Configuring Address Book synchronization between Forests
  13. Configuring Availability Sharing between Forests

This step-by-step process covers the major topics that need to be addresed while working on creating a Shared SMTP Namespace. Some of the above tasks are less time consuming and complicated than others but note that each of them is very vital in making things work.

Summary

That’s it for the Part 1 of this Series in which we covered a brief overview of the Scenario and listed down the steps that will need to be performed to achieve a single Shared SMTP Namespace. We will be covering these steps in detail in posts that will follow.

Click on the below link to access the different series parts:
Configuring SMTP Namespace Sharing between two Exchange Forests – Part 2
Configuring SMTP Namespace Sharing between two Exchange Forests – Part 3
Configuring SMTP Namespace Sharing between two Exchange Forests – Part 4
Configuring SMTP Namespace Sharing between two Exchange Forests – Part 5
Configuring SMTP Namespace Sharing between two Exchange Forests – Part 6 (Not Live)
Configuring SMTP Namespace Sharing between two Exchange Forests – Part 7 (Not Live)

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4 responses to “Configuring SMTP Namespace Sharing between two Exchange Forests – Part 1

  1. Pingback: Configuring SMTP Namespace Sharing between two Exchange Forests – Part 2 | Ibrahim Nore's Blog

  2. Pingback: Configuring SMTP Namespace Sharing between two Exchange Forests – Part 3 | Ibrahim Nore's Blog

  3. Pingback: Configuring SMTP Namespace Sharing between two Exchange Forests – Part 4 | Ibrahim Nore's Blog

  4. Pingback: Configuring SMTP Namespace Sharing between two Exchange Forests – Part 5 | Ibrahim Nore's Blog

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